News

Harvest (& Propane) Report from Landus Cooperative

Thanks to our farmers, our grain business achieved a milestone on Sunday, Nov. 17th by exceeding last year’s total corn and soybean bushels. We anticipate additional bushels coming in which means will exceed our estimates for grain receipts. Soybeans are right where we anticipated. Thanks to everyone who continues to work long hours in the grain business; our farmers, your drivers, your families, and our teams. 

Many of our locations are returning to normal business hours (8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) so please continue to use our app or website to see "Receiving Hours" at our locations. 

Also, recently our Bradford team was asked to assist in harvesting 900 acres in Franklin County for a farmer (and his wife) who were killed in a motorcycle accident last summer. A video recap of the day is below. We were humbled to be a part of the day. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIUw5R-CaPI&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2W_zkXWd6js7UPWdtw3mPL_VC8gSLKZE0O0S4acuMB_mrdctadESkjwd4

Propane

We have about 55-grain locations in 26 counties. About half our locations use natural gas dryers and about half use propane. 

Landus Cooperative needs about 15 loads per day to keep our propane dryers running and the location open for receiving. Over the last several days, we have been receiving 6-8 loads (but that was before negative wind chills set in). We have had locations that had to close or limit wet corn receiving as a result of the propane situation but also because dryers, regardless of their fuel source, can only dry so fast. 

If you receive, for example, 100,000 bushels for the day and can only dry 50,000 bushels of those at once, it creates a backlog. Given the volume of wet corn we received, it will be weeks after the conclusion of harvest before all corn is dried, just like on our farmers’ operations. In short, a propane shortage adds pain to the pinch-points the industry is already experiencing. 

We applaud our local haulers and their teams who are transporting propane to heat homes and livestock facilities; we recognize their priority. Like other grain receivers and farmers, we are doing our best to manage grain quality during the rush of harvest.